How Bad do You Want to Go to Hajj?

Will you ride a bicycle for two and a half months through 13 countries to go to Hajj?? (Special thanks to Abu Eesa and SisterinIslam for finding this. )

Source: IslamOnline.net and Yahoo!

Epic Bicycle Ride

URUS-MARTAN — Seeking the greatest spiritual experience in a Muslim’s life, a 63-year-old Chechen criss-crossed 13 countries on his rusting bicycle to join nearly three million Muslims from across the world in performing hajj.

“I was only afraid, and am afraid, of God — and that I might not reach my goal,”

Dzhanar-Aliyev Magomed-Ali told Agence France Presse (AFP) on Monday, January 29, after retuning home from the spiritual trip.

Magomed-Ali finished a 10-week trip on his old bike from Urus-Martan, a small village in Chechnya, to the holy city of Makkah in Saudi Arabia.

The distance between the capital Grozny and Makkah is nearly 5,000 kilometers but the aging Chechen clocked up nearly 12,000 kilometers in his circuitous route.

…..

He said the inspiration came from his mother who visited him in a dream.

…….

Incredible Journey

Determined to make the journey, Magomed-Ali took the precaution of training for his tough road, taking short cycle-rides around Chechnya’s war-ravaged landscape.

The elderly Chechen also equipped himself with 11 spare bicycle chains and six replacement inner tubes for his bicycle.

He recalled the unprecedented route he made through 13 states on his mud-splattered “iron horse” as he calls his old bicycle.

He left his village on November 8 heading to neighboring Azerbaijan, where he camped outside the Saudi embassy hoping for a visa.

“The consulate’s employees took me to be abnormal and couldn’t understand how I planned to get to their country by bicycle,” Mogomed-Ali told AFP, wearing his traditional sheepskin hat and woolen jumper.

After 18 days of relentless efforts with the consulate officials, he gave up and headed south across the border into Iran.

But later came the hardest leg of his journey when he reached war-ravaged Iraq, where he faced a dilemma with the US soldiers.

“Because I hadn’t got a visa, they broke my bicycle, smashed it against the ground and called me a Russian pig,”

Mogomed-Ali recalled.

“I told them I wasn’t Russian but a Muslim and they seized my passport and pointed to the crosses on the cover.”

He was then forced to turn around and head back to Iran and around Iraq through Armenia and Georgia, down through Turkey, Syria and Jordan.

Finally, after further border wrangles, the Chechen faithful reaches Saudi Arabia to seek his cherished destination, Makkah.

In the holy city, Mogomed-Ali was well-received and offered prayers for his family and homeland, before turning round and heading back home.

Despite the hardships he encountered, the old Chechen is now counting his blessings.

“I did the hajj in order to fulfill the will of my mother, who gave me life and taught me love for my homeland, which for me is priceless,”

Mogomed-Ali said, standing beside the bike adorned with the emblem of Chechen independence fighters.

The small mountainous republic of Chechnya has been ravaged by conflict since 1994, with just three years of relative peace after the first Russian invasion of the region ended in August 1996 and the second began in October 1999.

5 Responses to “How Bad do You Want to Go to Hajj?”


  1. 1 umm luqmaan January 30, 2007 at 6:34 pm

    mashallah that was a very moving piece. Subhanallah you look at the people that come here and take their hajj for granted and then you read things like this and you can only shake your head in disgust.Some people just have it too good. Subhanallah may we all be more grateful for what we have. ameen.

  2. 2 Muslimah_Mouse January 30, 2007 at 6:51 pm

    Subhan’Allah! Now *that’s* an inspiring story!

  3. 3 abu sara January 30, 2007 at 11:14 pm

    SubannaAllah.

    Where did you find that story?

  4. 4 Minda - NTU, Singapore February 1, 2007 at 9:28 am

    Hi bloggers, you’re invited to participate in our study on blogs and relationships (and it’s not a spam, really)

    Our study is affiliated with the Singapore Internet Research Centre (SiRC) and examples of previous studies can be found here: http://www.ntu.edu.sg/sci/sirc/workingpapers.html.

    Simply fill in the survey and you stand a chance to win US$50!! 3 prizes in total available.

    This is an academic research and all data are confidential. You may send any queries to: gohh0003@ntu.edu.sg or mind0001@ntu.edu.sg. Good luck and spread the word to fellow bloggers!

    The survey link: http://www.questionpro.com/akira/TakeSurvey?id=591306

  5. 5 Hajj Ihram November 3, 2007 at 5:38 pm

    Thats a great story, i hope i can go to Hajj one day Inshallah


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Fiqh As Sawm

Islamic Rulings Surrounding Ramadhan and Fasting. Based on “Manar As Sabeel Fi Sharh Ad Daleel” Of Shaykh Ibraheem ibn Duwaiyan (d. 1353 AH) as explained by Br. Salim Morgan. Transcribed and Edited By Ibn Al Hyderabadee

Prologue Introduction

Chapter 1: Fasting in Ramadhaan
1. A pillar of Islam 2. Obligation of Fasting 3. Sighting of the Moon for start of Ramadhaan 4. One reliable witness' presence is sufficient 5. Conditions that make Ramadhan Obligatory for an Individual 6. Expiation for the inability to fast due to age or illness 7. Requirements of a valid fast 8. Obligations to fulfill during fasting 9. Recommended acts of fasting

Chapter 2: Permissions and Prohibitions

1. Impermissible to break fast during Ramadhan 2. Prohibited to fast for a woman in her menstrual or post-partum bleedin 3. Obligatory to break it when it is required to save a person’s life 4. Recommended to break fast for one who is ill and fears harm from fasting. 5. Recommended to break fast when one is traveling 6. Permissible for one to break fast who begins a journey while fasting 7. Permissible for a pregnant or nursing (breast feeding) woman 8. Change of condition of a person doesn’t obligate one to refrain from eating and drinking the rest of the day. 9. Prohibited to fast a voluntary fast instead of an obligatory one.

Chapter 3: That which Invalidates Your Fast

1. Intentional Intake of anything into the abdomen 2. Intention to break fast 3. Fluctuating Intention to fast 4. Vomiting intentionally 5. Menstruation or Post Partum Bleeding 6. Masturbation 7. Marital Relations 8. Cupping for both parties 9. Death 10. Apostasy 11. Above are Exempted in some cases

Chapter 4: Repayment
1. Missing a day of fast in Ramadhan
2. When does one make up a missed fast
3. If missed fast are not made up until few dats before next Ramadhan
4. Missed fasts first or voluntary?

Chapter 5: Recommended, Disliked, and Impermissible Days of Fasting
1. Recommended Every Other Day Sawn Dawood
2. The three white days of every Islamic month
3. Six days of Shawwaal
4. Month of Muharram and the 10th
5. Ten days of Dhil Hijja and that of Arafat
6. Disliking of the month of Rajab
7. Disliking of the day of Friday
8. Disliking of the 30th of Shabaan
9. Impermissibility of fasting on the two Eids
10. Completing of a voluntary fast is not Wajib

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